signs of a stroke

Last night, we went to Squaw for a winter speaker series. Kit Deslauriers is the first person to ski down the 7 summits (highest mountain on each of the 7 continents) and is all around very adventurous and extra cool. Our friend PK, with whom Zack was skiing when he fell, was doing the sound and complimented Zack on his overall cheery, positive attitude. Zack’s response was, “well, stroke is bad!” Yes, the brain hemorrhaging and hematomas and stroke were worse. But, it is awesome that he continues to smile and do all his PT exercises and get out and about.

PK’s conversation reminded me that since Zack has to taper off his blood thinners before surgery, I am hyper aware of signs of a stroke. So for all of our edification, here is what the CDC says:

Woman holding her head.

Sudden severe headache with no known cause is a stroke sign in men and women.

During a stroke, every minute counts! Fast treatment can lessen the brain damage that a stroke can cause.

By knowing the signs and symptoms of stroke, you can take quick action and perhaps save a life—maybe even your own.

Signs of Stroke in Men and Women

  • Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking, or difficulty understanding speech
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance, or lack of coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

Call 9-1-1 right away if you or someone else has any of these symptoms.

Acting F.A.S.T. Is Key for Stroke

Recognize the Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

 

Published October 26, 2015

When someone is having a stroke, every minute counts. Just as putting out a fire quickly can stop it from spreading, treating a stroke quickly can reduce damage to the brain. If you learn how to recognize the telltale signs of a stroke, you can act quickly and save a life—maybe even your own.

Acting F.A.S.T. can help stroke patients get the treatments they desperately need. The stroke treatments that work best are available only if the stroke is recognized and diagnosed within 3 hours of the first symptoms. Stroke patients may not be eligible for these if they don’t arrive at the hospital in time.

If you think someone may be having a stroke, act F.A.S.T. and do the following simple test:

F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

T—Time: If you see any of these signs, call 9-1-1 right away.

Note the time when any symptoms first appear. This information helps health care providers determine the best treatment for each person. Do not drive to the hospital or let someone else drive you. Call an ambulance so that medical personnel can begin life-saving treatment on the way to the emergency room.

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